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Multimodal Mobility Dashboard - Central Puget Sound Region

Region executive summary

This dashboard includes detailed multimodal mobility analyses of five urban highway corridors in the central Puget Sound region, which includes Interstate 5 between Federal Way and Everett, Interstate 405 between Tukwila and Lynnwood, Interstate 90 between Seattle and Issaquah, State Route 520 between Seattle and Redmond, and State Route 167 between Auburn and Renton along with the central Puget Sound HOV performance analysis. The peak periods for all corridors in the central Puget Sound region are defined as 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. (morning peak) and 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. (evening peak).

2019 Highlights

  • Approximately 4.84 billion person miles were traveled on the I-5, I-405, I-90, SR 520 and SR 167 corridors in the Central Puget Sound region in 2019, down 0.5% from 4.86 billion person miles in 2018
  • Vehicle delay on the I-5, I-405, I-90, SR 520 and SR 167 corridors in the Central Puget Sound region decreased 6% from 8.6 million hours in 2018 to 8.1 million hours in 2019 2019 Notable Result
  • In 2019 during the southbound morning commute, buses (1.1% of all vehicles) moved 27.7% of travelers on I-5 at N 145th Street
  • The SR 99 tunnel in downtown Seattle opened in February 2019, replacing the SR 99 Alaskan Way Viaduct
  • The I-405/SR 167 direct connector in Renton opened in 2019, providing a seamless connection between SR 167 HOT lanes and I-405 HOV lanes
  • WSDOT temporarily closed the SR 520 HOV lane approaching Montlake in October 2019 in order to make space for construction. Work on this project is scheduled to be complete in 2023

For additional details on the central Puget Sound region project highlights, visit 2019 Region Highlights

Central Puget sound map image

Interstate 5

The Interstate 5 corridor in the central Puget Sound region runs between Federal Way and Everett, passing through Seattle. It is the most important commute and economic highway corridor in the region. WSDOT classifies the I-5 corridor between Federal Way and Everett as a T-1 freight corridor, meaning that trucks carry more than 10 million tons of freight on this corridor annually. The I-5 corridor is served by transit buses, Link Light Rail, Sounder commuter rail, high occupancy vehicle lanes and Amtrak Cascades passenger rail. It is also the part of the “West Coast Electric Highway” which has an extensive network of electric vehicle (EV) DC fast-charging stations located every 25 to 50 miles along Interstate 5 for the electric vehicles. Click the green bar below for more information on Interstate 5 multimodal mobility analysis.

Go to Interstate 5 Multimodal Mobility Analysis page
I-5 map image

Interstate 405

Interstate 405 is a key commute and economic corridor in the central Puget Sound region, running parallel to I-5 between Tukwila and Lynnwood. WSDOT classifies the I-405 corridor between Tukwila and Lynnwood as a T-1 freight corridor, meaning that trucks carry more than 10 million tons of freight on this corridor annually. The I-405 corridor is served by transit buses, HOV lanes and, between Bellevue and Lynnwood, by Express Toll Lanes (ETLs). For detailed information about the I-405 ETLs, see I-405 Express Toll Lanes Between Bellevue and Lynnwood | WSDOT (wa.gov). Click the green bar below for more information on Interstate 405 multimodal mobility analysis.

Go to Interstate 405 Multimodal Mobility Analysis page
I-405 map image

Interstate 90

Interstate 90 runs parallel to SR 520 across Lake Washington, and is a key commute and economic corridor connecting I-5 and I-405 in the central Puget Sound region. WSDOT classifies the I-90 corridor between Seattle and Issaquah as a T-1 freight corridor, meaning that trucks carry more than 10 million tons of freight on this corridor annually. The corridor is served by transit buses and high occupancy vehicle lanes. The I-90 floating bridge is the non-tolled alternative to SR 520 across Lake Washington. Click the green bar below for more information on Interstate 90 multimodal mobility analysis.

Go to Interstate 90 Multimodal Mobility Analysis page
Interstate 90 map image

State Route 520

State Route 520 is a key commute and economic corridor in the central Puget Sound region, connecting Seattle to Eastside suburbs and I-5 to I-405. WSDOT classifies the SR 520 corridor between Seattle and Redmond as a T-1 freight corridor, meaning that trucks carry more than 10 million tons of freight on this corridor annually. The SR 520 corridor is served by transit buses and high occupancy vehicle lanes, and the SR 520 Evergreen Point Floating Bridge is tolled in both directions. For detailed information on the tolling of the SR 520 floating bridge, see SR 520 Bridge Tolling | WSDOT (wa.gov). Click the green bar below for more information on State Route 520 multimodal mobility analysis.

Go to State Route 520 Multimodal Mobility Analysis page
SR520 map image

State Route 167

State Route 167 is a key commute and economic corridor in the central Puget Sound region that functions as an extension of I-405 south of the Tukwila/Renton area. WSDOT classifies the SR 167 corridor between Auburn and Renton as a T-1 freight corridor, meaning that trucks carry more than 10 million tons of freight on this corridor annually. The SR 167 corridor is served by Sounder commuter rail, transit buses, and high occupancy toll lanes. I-405 and SR167 are connected by direct connection that provides seamless connection between the HOT lanes on SR 167 and the high occupancy vehicle lanes on I-405 in Renton. For detailed information about the SR 167 HOT lanes, see SR 167 HOT Lanes | WSDOT (wa.gov). Click the green bar below for more information on State Route 167 multimodal mobility analysis.

Go to State Route 167 Multimodal Mobility Analysis page

  SR 167 map image

High Occupancy Vehicle Trip Analysis

High occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes are reserved for carpools, vanpools, buses, motorcycles or any vehicle carrying a minimum number of people (either two or three, depending on the location and time of day), in addition to certain other vehicles granted access by the Legislature.

The central Puget Sound region freeway network includes a system of HOV lanes designed to provide faster and more reliable options for travelers. This system also enhances the efficient operation of the freeway network by moving more people in fewer vehicles than adjacent general purpose (GP) lanes. About 310 lane-miles of the planned 369-mile Puget Sound region HOV network have been completed. These figures reflect the HOV freeway system and exclude ramps and arterials; the planned freeway lane-miles have been updated based on new projects funded through Connecting Washington and additional HOV options such as high occupancy toll lanes and express toll lanes. More information about the HOV lane network can be found at http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/hov/. Click the green bar below for more information on HOV performance analysis.

Go to HOV performance analysis page

  HOV map image
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