Pavement - Deferred Preservation Liability

On this page:

Deferred Preservation Liability

Performance analysis

2021

Preservation backlog increases

WSDOT's pavement Deferred Preservation Liability (also known as the pavement preservation backlog) increased 9.6% from $478 million in 2020 to $524 million in 2021.

When funding is inadequate to maintain pavement in an acceptable condition, WSDOT uses Deferred Preservation Liability to indicate the investment that will eventually be needed to restore the pavement network to an adequate condition.

The DPL estimates the accumulated cost to fund the backlog of past-due (deferred) pavement rehabilitation work. The goal is to have a DPL of $0.

Over the past five years, WSDOT's DPL has increased approximately 51.5% from $346 million in 2017. The DPL will continue to increase until necessary preservation funding is allocated. While Move Ahead Washington funding will help WSDOT more adequately address its growing backlog of pavement preservation needs, the funding is expected to present challenges such as planning, designing, constructing and staffing. Due to the extensive backlog, the agency does not anticipate immediate results.

2020

WSDOT's preservation backlog increases in 2020

WSDOT's pavement Deferred Preservation Liability (also known as the pavement preservation backlog) increased 35.8% from $352 million in 2019 to $478 million in 2020.

When funding is inadequate to maintain pavement in an acceptable condition, WSDOT uses Deferred Preservation Liability to indicate the investment that will eventually be needed to restore the pavement network to an adequate condition.

The DPL estimates the accumulated cost to fund the backlog of past-due (deferred) pavement rehabilitation work. The goal is to have a DPL of $0. In 2020, WSDOT's DPL had increased approximately 45% from $330 million in 2016. The DPL will continue to increase until adequate preservation funding is allocated.

2019

WSDOT's preservation backlog decreases in 2019

WSDOT's pavement Deferred Preservation Liability (also known as the pavement preservation backlog) decreased by $68 million (16.2%) from $420 million in 2018 to $352 million in 2019. Despite this improvement, the backlog of past-due pavement preservation work remains large, and given current funding levels for preservation, WSDOT expects it to grow in the future.

WSDOT uses DPL to track how much investment is needed to restore the entire pavement network to fair or better condition. The agency's goal is to have a DPL of $0.

2018

Preservation backlog grows in 2018

WSDOT's pavement Deferred Preservation Liability (also known as the pavement preservation backlog) increased by $74 million (21.4%) from $346 million in 2017 to $420 million in 2018 (see chart at left). Growth in the backlog is a result of WSDOT's pavement preservation needs continuing to exceed the funding available to address them.

WSDOT uses DPL to track how much investment is needed to restore the entire pavement network to fair or better condition. The agency's goal is to have a DPL of $0.

2017

Preservation backlog grows in 2017

WSDOT's pavement Deferred Preservation Liability (also known as the pavement preservation backlog) increased 4.8% from $330 million in 2016 to $346 million in 2017.

WSDOT's goal is to have a Deferred Preservation Liability of $0. WSDOT uses Deferred Preservation Liability—an estimate of the accumulated cost of performing all past-due pavement rehabilitation work—to track how much investment is needed to restore the entire pavement network to fair or better condition.

Top of page