Washington State Ferries Vessels & Terminals - Terminal preservation backlog

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Terminal preservation backlog

Source: Washington State Ferries.

Performance analysis

FY2022

WSF terminal preservation backlog projections predict 2.9% of systems will not be in State of Good Repair by end of FY2025

If 100% of preservation funds are programmed, WSF predicts 2.9% (by replacement cost) of the agency's terminal systems will not be in a SOGR by the end of FY2025. At this funding level, the rate of terminal assets not in SOGR is expected to be 1% by the end of FY2031.

If the preservation funding level is reduced by 50%, the percentage of terminal assets not in a SOGR is predicted to increase to 7.1% by the end of FY2025. With no funding, the percentage of terminal assets not in a SOGR is predicted to increase to 11.3%.

If WSF's terminals funding is reduced, there will likely be a reduction in service reliability and an increase in maintenance costs. WSF is currently working to illustrate the impacts of funding shortfalls and the strategic approaches it plans to take to provide a safe and reliable transportation system.

FY2021

WSF terminal preservation backlog projections predict 6.8% of systems will not be in State of Good Repair by end of FY2023

If 100% of preservation funds are programmed, WSF predicts that 6.8% (by replacement cost) of the agency's terminal systems will not be in a SOGR by the end of FY2023. At this funding level, the rate of terminal assets not in SOGR is expected to be 1% by the end of FY2031.

If the preservation funding level is reduced by 50%, the percentage of terminal assets not in a SOGR is predicted to increase to 15.9% by the end of FY2031. With no funding, the percentage of terminal assets not in a SOGR almost doubles and is predicted to increase to 30.9%.

If WSF's terminals funding is reduced, there will likely be a reduction in service reliability and an increase in maintenance costs. WSF is currently working to illustrate the impacts of funding shortfalls and the strategic approaches it plans to take to provide a safe and reliable transportation system.

FY2020

WSF terminal preservation backlog projections indicate 3.6% decrease by FY2025

WSF's terminal preservation backlog is projected to be equivalent to 6.2% of the cost of replacing all 722 of the agency's terminal systems by the end of FY2021. At funding levels in the 2021 budget submittal, WSF's backlog is projected to decrease to 3.6% by the end of the FY2025, then increase to 5.9% by the end of the FY2029. Risk-based life cycle cost analysis balances the use of capital preservation funding and maintenance funding to maintain the assets in a SOGR at the least possible cost.

WSF recently replaced an aging ferry terminal at Mukilteo, and another major project is under construction at Seattle terminal that is scheduled for completion in 2023. Upon completion, the terminal preservation backlog will decrease to its lowest projected level over the upcoming 10-year period.

If the funding level is reduced by 50%, the backlog percentage is predicted to increase steadily to 17.5% by the end of the FY2029. If WSF's terminals funding is reduced, there will likely be a reduction in service reliability and an increase in maintenance costs. WSF is currently working to illustrate the impacts of funding shortfalls and the strategic approaches it plans to take to provide a safe and reliable transportation system.

FY2019

WSF terminal preservation backlog approximately $121 million in FY2019

As of the end of FY2019, the cost of clearing WSF's terminal preservation backlog was approximately $121.0 million, or 8.2% of the cost of replacing all 755 terminal systems. WSF's backlog for terminal assets is projected to decrease to 3.0% by the end of the FY2025, then increase to 6.6% by the end of the FY2029.

Two major terminal projects are currently under construction. The new Mukilteo terminal will open in the fall of 2020, and the new Seattle multimodal terminal will be complete in 2023. When construction of these two terminals is complete, the terminal preservation backlog is expected to temporarily decrease.

If the funding levels were reduced by 50%, the backlog percentages are predicted to increase steadily up to 21% by the end of the FY2029. A comparison of the 100% funding and 50% funding scenarios with the no-funding scenario helps to measure the relative effects of various levels of funding (see chart above). If WSF's terminals funding is reduced, there will likely be a reduction in service reliability and an increase in maintenance costs.

WSF assesses its terminal priorities every year based on updated information from inspections, risk costs and available funding. The use of an economic-based asset management model incorporating updated information helps WSF reprioritize terminal projects based on economic cost-benefit analyses.

FY2018

Terminal preservation backlog increases in FY2018

WSF's terminal preservation backlog increased 6.5% from $72.8 million in FY2017 to $77.7 million in FY2018, based on the terminal Economic Based Asset Management Model.

WSF's terminal preservation backlog increased 6.5% from $72.8 million in FY2017 to $77.7 million in FY2018, based on the terminal Economic Based Asset Management Model. One reason for this increase is that WSF has two major terminal projects under construction: the Seattle Multimodal Terminal at Colman Dock and the Mukilteo Ferry Terminal. These are multi-year, multi-million dollar projects that concentrate preservation funds on the most critical needs.

Another reason is that some construction projects scheduled for the 2017-2019 biennium were postponed and will begin in 2021. When those construction projects are complete, assets past due for replacement that are within the scope of the larger projects will be replaced, resulting in a decrease of the overall past due percentage. Replacement of assets is not credited until the entire project is completed, which creates a reporting lag of potentially several years between the asset's physical replacement and the past due percentage decrease.

WSDOT has budgeted $319.3 million to support the terminal preservation plan in the 2017-2019 and 2019-2021 biennia. WSF is projected to spend this amount to reduce the terminal backlog.

FY2017

Terminal preservation backlog sees increases from beginning of biennium

Using the terminal Economic Based Model preservation plan, the preservation backlog of the value of systems past due for replacement would have increased from 3.7% at the beginning of the 2015-2017 biennium (July 2015) to 5.4% at the end of the biennium (June 2017) if no preservation inventory items are addressed.

WSDOT budgeted $66.5 million to support the terminal preservation plan and to reduce the economicbased terminal needs backlog to 5.1% in the 2015-2017 biennium. At the end of the biennium (June 2017), with the investment, the backlog was at 5.2%.

During the second half of the 2015- 2017 biennium WSDOT replaced over 20% of the Vashon trestle, removing more than 121 tons of creosote piles.

WSDOT also replaced the transfer span towers at Coupeville, and the slip 2 wingwalls at Bremerton. Terminal preservation ended the 2015-2017 biennium spending $46.0 million (69.2%) of the $66.5 million biennial preservation budget. Delays in contracts on the Seattle Terminal Building and North Trestle Replacement project were the main reason for underspending the preservation budget.

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