Revive I-5: Preserving the freeway

I-5 is Washington's busiest freeway

Built in the 1960s, Interstate 5 is Washington’s busiest freeway. Preserving this highway is an enormous undertaking that grows each year as the weather and billions of tires take a toll on pavement that is nearing the end of its useful life.

WSDOT is working to ensure that the interstate continues to perform at its best for as long as possible, preserving I-5 through regular inspections and preventative maintenance, along with months-long construction projects. Many of these are included in the draft plan; others are not funded at this time.

Timeline

Completing this work will take more than a decade. Managing traffic and congestion during pavement preservation work requires careful and coordinated planning that considers time of year, regional special events, changes to the transit system and other state or local road closures. All lane and ramp closures are carefully timed. However, emergency repairs could happen at any time.

Projects for 2021-22

I-5 - NB Seneca to SR 520 - Mobility Improvements

I-5/SB Spokane Street to I-90 Vic

I-5/Duwamish River to Lucile St.

Completed projects

Seattle and north King County
I-5 - NB MLK Jr Way to NE Ravenna Br - Pavement Repair & More (Complete December 2019)

I-5 - SB Lucile St to Spring St - Pavement Repair (Complete October 2019)

I-5 - SB S 320th St to Duwamish River Bridge - Concrete Pavement Rehab (Complete July 2017)

I-5 - North Seattle to Mountlake Terrace - Pavement Repair (Complete November 2015)

I-5 - Downtown Seattle - Bridge Deck Rehab & Expansion Joint Repair (Complete June 2014)

South King County
I-5 - NB S 260th St to Duwamish River Br - Concrete Pavement Rehab & ADA (Complete October 2019)

SB I-5 - Tukwila to Federal Way - Concrete Pavement Rehab (Complete July 2017)

Snohomish County
I-5 - NB SR 104 Vic to 164th St SW I/C - Paving, Expansion Joints & ADA (Complete November 2019)

The future

WSDOT has 29 projects along I-5 in King County alone that are included in the 10-year plan. Some of these projects will be combined for efficiency.

Another 26 projects in the same corridor have been identified, but thus far are not funded.

It all adds up to a lot of work on I-5. Travelers who rely on the freeway will have to plan ahead as we complete these projects. Some will be able to use alternatives like transit, carpools, vanpools or working from home or remote office locations. For those who can’t take advantage of these options, it will mean increased travel time. But this work is necessary to preserve the region’s most important arterial; if all travelers plan ahead, together we can limit the how these projects affect everyone's travel.