Contents tagged with home

  • Looking forward to a busy 2018

    There’s a lot to be excited about as the Alaskan Way Viaduct Replacement Program enters 2018. We’re working toward several important construction milestones.

    Pushing toward tunnel completion

    STP made great progress last year. They finished tunneling, disassembled the tunneling machine and completed the southbound (upper) roadway inside the tunnel. Based on STP’s newest schedule (PDF), the tunnel could open to drivers as soon as this fall. Our goal is to safely open the tunnel to traffic as quickly as possible and begin removing the Alaskan Way Viaduct, but it’s too early to accurately predict a tunnel opening date. Safety and quality remain our top priorities, and will continue to guide all work on the program.

    A significant amount of work remains between now and tunnel opening. Crews must complete construction of the roadway within the tunnel, and finish installing many interconnected systems that will be required to operate the tunnel. They also must complete a series of thorough tests and certification by the Seattle Fire Department to ensure the systems are working properly. This includes testing approximately 5,000 individual components and nearly 90 tunnel systems. 

    As always, WSDOT will continue to closely monitor STP’s work. You can do the same at our construction tracking page.

    The road to tunnel opening

    As STP continues their work, construction of final ramp and highway connections to the tunnel is set to begin. The SR 99 Connections Project will build the final connections between the existing highway and the tunnel. Scarsella Bros., Inc. is the contractor for this work, which will be performed under a $22.6 million contract awarded by WSDOT last month.

    Scarsella will break ground soon and continue their work throughout this year. When the tunnel is ready to open, SR 99 through downtown Seattle will be closed to traffic for approximately three weeks. Ramps to and from SR 99 will also be affected during this work. The final connections to the tunnel can only be built after the viaduct has been closed because crews must demolish portions of the current roadway to realign SR 99. When these roadway connections are complete, drivers will begin using the new tunnel.

    We recognize that this temporary closure of SR 99 will affect the entire region. We’re also aware that the tunnel is one of many projects under construction in downtown Seattle. We will continue to coordinate construction activities with the City of Seattle, Port of Seattle and King County to minimize disruptions to the public. As we always do during major highway closures, we will coordinate with our partner agencies to spread the word, and help keep people and goods moving while crews complete their work.

    After the tunnel opens

    After the tunnel opens to drivers, we can begin the challenging task of demolishing the Alaskan Way Viaduct. The demolition contractor will also be responsible for decommissioning the Battery Street Tunnel and reconnecting surface streets across Aurora Avenue North. These three projects were combined under a single design-build contract to shave off approximately one year of cumulative construction time. 

    As we explained this summer, the contractor will determine how the viaduct will be demolished within parameters set in the contract. We plan to select a contractor in late spring, and will share the demolition plan and schedule after the contractor is chosen.

    We’re excited about the work that lies ahead in 2018. Stay tuned for new photos, videos and social media updates as we push toward tunnel opening.

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  • Looking back on a year of great progress

    Less than 12 months ago, the tunneling machine Bertha was assembling tunnel rings beneath the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle. The machine was 2,500 feet away from the finish line near Seattle Center, with an estimated arrival of June 2017.
     
    So much has been accomplished in the past year, highlighted by Bertha’s arrival in April. Today all the rings are built and the tunneling machine is entirely disassembled. Inside the tunnel, the southbound deck is 99 percent complete and the northbound deck stretches over 2,400 feet.
     
    The contractor crews from Seattle Tunnel Partners completed far too much work this year to capture in one video, but here is a year-end review:
     

    Other highlights from a successful 2017:


    A big thank you to everyone who tuned in this year as we reported on the progress being made to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Stay with us for 2018 as we near completion of the tunnel!

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  • New virtual library will preserve Milepost 31’s exhibits

    Milepost 31, our award-winning information center in Pioneer Square, will be closing this Saturday. During the six years it was open, Milepost 31 welcomed nearly 80,000 visitors and was an important resource for people exploring the Pioneer Square neighborhood.

    Spots remain open for our final viewing platform tours! Looking for a free activity over Thanksgiving weekend? Take a tour on Saturday.

    If you don’t get a chance to visit the center this week, its exhibits on the history of the land that became Pioneer Square will live on beyond the physical venue’s closure. We have created a virtual library featuring 360-degree views of Milepost 31’s displays and videos: www.milepost31.com.

    Screen shot from milepost website showing view of exhibit

    A big thank you to the staff, volunteers, partners and attendees who have helped make Milepost 31 a success.

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  • Fly the SR 99 tunnel – from the Space Needle to the stadiums

    Today we are excited to share a drone's-eye view of two miles of tunnel in two minutes. This video captures the ongoing construction of the interior roadways, safety systems and other elements that will carry and safeguard drivers passing beneath downtown Seattle in the new SR 99 tunnel.

    The drone enters at the tunnel’s north end, near Seattle Center. Crews are building the tunnel’s interior structures starting from the south, so as the drone advances the tunnel becomes more complete. The drone flies along the tunnel's upper deck, which is 85% built. At the tunnel’s south end, the drone passes from the bored section of the tunnel (9,270 feet long and dug by Bertha, the tunneling machine) and into the cut-and-cover section, built in the launch pit where Bertha began her tunnel drive.

    One big tunnel element not seen in this video is the tunnel’s lower deck. In early November, the tunnel contractor Seattle Tunnel Partners plans to begin delivering large, prefabricated roadway panels to build that deck (the future northbound roadway). You can track progress on that and other tunnel elements on our tunnel progress tracker.

    There’s much work still to come in building the tunnel’s interior roadway and completing systems like ventilation, sprinklers and traffic cameras. We’ll continue to share and document crews’ progress building the tunnel on in our Flickr albums and on Twitter

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  • #99closure feature: Drone footage inside the SR 99 tunnel

    Just a few days before the SR 99 tunneling machine started tunneling under the Alaskan Way Viaduct, the Washington State Department of Transportation flew a video-equipped drone through the SR 99 tunnel to show Seattle Tunnel Partners’ construction progress. There has been continued interest in seeing what has been built below ground and this video gives a glimpse of the tunnel as well as the nooks and crannies of the complex tunneling machine.

    On an average day, the tunnel is … more

  • The choreography of a concrete pour

    This week, at the south entrance to the bored tunnel, Seattle Tunnel Partners is pouring concrete for a section of the future southbound highway. On one hand, the pouring of concrete (also known as a "concrete placement”) is nothing extraordinary – it’s a common occurrence on a project that will use enough concrete to build nine football stadiums. But their frequency belies the complex choreography that goes into executing each pour successfully. Since concrete plays … more

  • Take a virtual tour of SR 99 tunnel construction

    Keeping the public informed about our work to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct is an important part of what we do every day. Our goal is to give you as much access as possible to this amazing project, which is why we regularly post updates, photos and videos of our progress. We even offer walking tours from our information center, Milepost 31, to a viewing platform that overlooks the pit where tunneling began in summer 2013.

    Unfortunately, there’s one frequently received request … more

  • New narrated video explains Bertha repair work

    As reported elsewhere on our website, work to access and repair the SR 99 tunneling machine is coming along. We’ve heard from some people that Seattle Tunnel Partners’ repair plan is hard to picture. Enter STP’s Chris Dixon, who was nice enough to narrate a video that explains what crews are doing to resume tunneling by March 2015. Watch it on YouTube or download a WMV file.

    Other resources 

    Seattle Tunnel Partners repair work plan (pdf 4.8 Mb) … more

  • What we’re doing to keep traffic moving during the four-day SR 99 closure

    We’ve been asking you to do your part to reduce congestion when SR 99 closes for four days starting Friday night, Aug. 22. That includes things like changing your commute habits and choosing an alternate way to get around.

    But what are we, the agencies tasked with keeping traffic moving during this closure, doing to help? Quite a bit, actually. Here’s a roundup of some of the steps we’re taking to help you and your fellow commuters through the closure.

    Washington … more

  • Traffic shift underway on State Route 99 near the stadiums

    Less than three years ago, crews demolished the southern mile of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. When they did, they shifted traffic onto a new section of State Route 99 south of downtown Seattle.

    Much of that new section of SR 99 is permanent, but the piece west of the stadiums is temporary. This curving stretch of road takes drivers around the SR 99 tunnel construction site and connects to the remaining section of the viaduct near South King Street. It’s nothing fancy, but it’s … more