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SR 28 Wenatchee Eastside Corridor Project Alternatives

Following the Introductory Open House and Stakeholder Workshop, the project team had thirty-four alternative routes to review and consider for inclusion and evaluation in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because of the detailed level of study and analysis that occurs in preparation of an EIS, only a reasonable number of alternatives can be considered. In order to determine which alternatives would be the most appropriate for study in the Eastside Corridor EIS, the project team began a screening process. The process involved rating each of the thirty-four alternatives with respect to specific criteria. The criteria included transportation service improvements, safety, anticipated engineering and regulatory feasibility, as well as minimizing residential and business displacement. Sixteen alternatives were deemed viable after this first round of screening. (See Initial Screening Analysis. pdf format)

The project team next evaluated the sixteen alignments against more detailed criteria which included impacts to neighborhood connectivity, impacts to parks, impacts to recreational facilities, impacts to cultural resources, farmland and biological resources. These criteria were developed by roadway design engineers, traffic engineers and environmental planners, all of whom were informed by stakeholder and community input from the public Scoping Meeting held in June 2001. (See Second Level Screening Analysis. pdf format) The second round of evaluation and screening was an iterative process. After input from the public and the interdisciplinary team, four alternative routes emerged for detailed analysis and study in the environmental impact statement. (See Eastside Corridor EIS Interdisciplinary Team Recommended Alternatives. pdf format)

The four alternatives, along with No-build Alternative, were included in the preliminary Draft Environmental Impact Statement (pDEIS) reviewed by WSDOT and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in Spring 2003. In June 2003, WSDOT identified a preliminary preferred alternative that was presented to the public at an open house held on June 12, 2003.

In July 2003, WSDOT, FHWA and the Wenatchee Valley Transportation Council agreed to add an option to the preliminary preferred alternative. The current alternatives under study consist of the No-build Alternative and four build alternatives, one of which has two options. These alternatives are described and evaluated in the DEIS.

Alternative 1: One Way Couplet – Sunset Highway /Cascade Avenue.

This route would consist of a pair of three lane, one way streets; Sunset Highway as the one way northbound route and Cascade as the southbound route. Cascade Avenue would be extended at the south end to connect with the existing Sunset Highway in the area between 13th Street and 15th Street. This route would have access at all intersections and access to existing properties along Sunset Highway and Cascade Avenue would remain. This alternative will also be analyzed to ensure connectivity between the one-way streets.

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Alternative 2: Widening of Sunset Highway to five lanes and widening of Cascade Ave to three lanes.

In this alternative, Cascade Avenue would be widened to three lanes from 19th Street and a to-be-determined point at the north end and extended from 19th Street to a connection with Sunset Highway in the area between 13th Street and 15th Street. Sunset Highway would be widened to five lanes between the SR2/SR28/SR97 intersection and 9th Street. The widening of Sunset Highway would be designed to minimize impacts to the existing residences and businesses located along the highway. Sunset Highway would have access at all intersections and retain existing access to residences and businesses where possible. Cascade Avenue would have access at all intersections and would retain access to existing properties (including homes and orchards) along Cascade Avenue.

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Alternative 3A: Widening of Sunset Highway to five lanes and the extension of Eastmont Avenue from approximately Valley View Drive to the SR2/SR28/SR97 intersection.

This route would extend Eastmont Avenue from Valley View Drive, which is proposed to be widened by the City/County to three lanes, to the SR2/SR28/SR97 intersection. Sunset Highway would be widened to five lanes between the Odabashian Bridge and 9th Street. The widening of Sunset Highway would be designed to minimize impacts to the residences and businesses located along the existing highway. Sunset Highway would have access at all intersections and maintain existing access to residences and businesses where possible. Eastmont Avenue would have access at all intersections and retain access to exiting properties along the highway.

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Alternative 3B: (Preferred FEIS Alternative) Widening of Sunset Highway to four lanes and the extension of Eastmont Avenue from approximately Valley View Drive to the SR2/SR28/SR97 intersection.

This option is a variation of Alternative 3A that would include the proposed extension of Eastmont Avenue and widen Sunset Highway to only four lanes with a center divider (eliminating the center left-turn lane proposed in Alternative 3A). The divider would limit access to properties between intersections to right-turn-in and right-turn-out only. Some intersections would allow U-turns to facilitate access between intersections. All other elements of Alternative 3A would remain the same in this option.

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Alternative 4: Western Route 300’ from Columbia River Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM).

This alignment would be located west of the existing Sunset Highway, maximizing the use of the existing state highway land while remaining beyond 300 feet of the ordinary high water mark of the Columbia River where possible. The southern end would tie into the existing Sunset Highway in the vicinity of 15th Street. Sunset Highway would be widened to five lanes from the vicinity of 15th Street to 9th Street and would occur to the east of the existing highway. This alignment was selected on the basis that it falls outside of the 300 foot zone of the ordinary high water mark of the Columbia River and thereby complies with the provisions of the Endangered Species Act. (ESA). The southern portion of this route would follow the existing highway alignment, which falls within the 200 foot shoreline management act jurisdictional zone.

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